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 Words that you don't see everyday

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Bài gửiTiêu đề: Re: Words that you don't see everyday   Sat Sep 15, 2012 9:42 pm

impeccable

PRONUNCIATION:
(im-PEK-uh-buhl)

MEANING:
adjective:
1. Faultless or blameless.
2. Incapable of sin or error.

ETYMOLOGY:
From Latin im- (not) Latin + peccare (to err or sin). Ultimately from the Indo-European root ped- (foot) which also gave us peccavi, peccadillo (alluding to a stumble or fall) pedal, podium, octopus, and impeach. Earliest documented use: 1531.

USAGE:
"An example of its fastidious attention to detail, is the impeccable English spelling on its (very clean) menu."
Jason Taitz; Fast and Fastidious; The Jerusalem Post (Israel); Dec 3, 2010.

Explore "impeccable" in the Visual Thesaurus.

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY:
The world is in greater peril from those who tolerate or encourage evil than from those who actually commit it. -Albert Einstein, physicist, Nobel laureate (1879-1955)

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Bài gửiTiêu đề: Re: Words that you don't see everyday   Sat Sep 15, 2012 9:43 pm

imperious


PRONUNCIATION:
(im-PEER-ee-uhs)

MEANING:
adjective:
1. Domineering; dictatorial.
2. Urgent; imperative.

ETYMOLOGY:
From Latin imperare (to command) which also resulted in imperative, emperor, empire, and imperial. Earliest documented use: 1541.

USAGE:
"She had an imperious manner that dared anyone to get in her way. She wore impeccable suits."
Helen Stringer; Spellbinder; Macmillan; 2009.

Explore "imperious" in the Visual Thesaurus.

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY:
In the cellars of the night, when the mind starts moving around old trunks of bad times, the pain of this and the shame of that, the memory of a small boldness is a hand to hold. -John Leonard, critic (1939-2008)

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Bài gửiTiêu đề: Re: Words that you don't see everyday   Sat Sep 15, 2012 9:44 pm

rapacious

PRONUNCIATION:
(ruh-PAY-shush)

MEANING:
adjective:
1. Greedy; plundering.
2. (Animals) Living on prey: predacious.

ETYMOLOGY:
From Latin rapere (to seize). Ultimately from the Indo-European root rep- (to snatch) that also gave us rapid, ravish, ravage, rapt, and r@pe. Earliest documented use: 1572.

USAGE:
"Banana's history involved enough imperious diplomats, corrupt dictators, rapacious tycoons and exploited workers to fill many volumes."
Marc Levinson; Please, No More Bananas; The Wall Street Journal (New York); Jul 2, 2012.

Explore "rapacious" in the Visual Thesaurus.

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY:
I long to accomplish a great and noble task, but it is my chief duty to accomplish humble tasks as though they were great and noble. The world is moved along, not only by the mighty shoves of its heroes, but also by the aggregate of the tiny pushes of each honest worker. -Helen Adams Keller, lecturer and author (1880-1968)

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Bài gửiTiêu đề: Re: Words that you don't see everyday   Mon Sep 17, 2012 6:35 pm

It's nice to see more and more of the world's information getting organized -- sorted, indexed, and cataloged -- making it easy to find. We now know more of what is where and how to access it.
But there's something to be said about serendipity. Sometimes there's no substitute for walking into a random aisle in a library and perusing books. Sometimes getting lost results in finding what you may need.

Recognizing this, there are websites to suggest a website at random for you. And we have a way for you to see a word at random from AWAD archives, and so on.

In that spirit, this week's words have been selected randomly, by getting lost in the dictionary and landing on a word.


incommodious

PRONUNCIATION:
(in-kuh-MOH-dee-uhs)

MEANING:
adjective: Inconvenient or uncomfortable.

ETYMOLOGY:
From Latin commodus (convenient), from com- (with) + modus (mode, measure). Ultimately from the Indo-European root med- (to take appropriate measures), which is also the source of medicine, modern, modify, modest, modulate, discommode and incommode. Earliest documented use: 1551.

USAGE:
"An incommodious little wooden house is where this deaf teacher lived." Tamara Eidelman; Kaluga's Rocket Scientist; Russian Life; (Montpelier, Vermont); Sep/Oct 2007.

Explore "incommodious" in the Visual Thesaurus.

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY:
The tragedy in the lives of most of us is that we go through life walking down a high-walled land with people of our own kind, the same economic situation, the same national background and education and religious outlook. And beyond those walls, all humanity lies, unknown and unseen, and untouched by our restricted and impoverished lives. -Florence Luscomb, architect and suffragist (1887-1985)


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Bài gửiTiêu đề: Re: Words that you don't see everyday   Thu Sep 20, 2012 12:12 pm

mendacity

PRONUNCIATION:
(men-DAS-i-tee)


MEANING:
noun:
1. The quality of being untruthful: a tendency to lie.
2. A lie.


ETYMOLOGY:
From Latin mendac-, stem of mendax (lying), from mendum (fault or defect) that also gave us amend, emend, and mendicant. Earliest documented use: 1540.


USAGE:
"The story of the founding of the Mormon church in Ohio in 1830 and its unlikely trek from there to Missouri to Illinois to Salt Lake City is one of the great adventures of the nineteenth century. It is an enthralling journey rich with acts of bravery, frailty, strength, violence, and mendacity, the most hideous being the Mountain Meadows Massacre."
Laurie Winer; The Mormon Candidate; Los Angeles Review of Books; Aug 26, 2012.

Explore "mendacity" in the Visual Thesaurus.


A THOUGHT FOR TODAY:
If, every day, I dare to remember that I am here on loan, that this house, this hillside, these minutes are all leased to me, not given, I will never despair. Despair is for those who expect to live forever. I no longer do. -Erica Jong, writer (b. 1942)


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Bài gửiTiêu đề: Re: Words that you don't see everyday   Thu Sep 20, 2012 12:14 pm

marmoreal


PRONUNCIATION:
(mahr-MOHR-ee-uhl)

MEANING:
adjective: Resembling marble or a marble statue, for example, in smoothness, whiteness, hardness, coldness, or aloofness.

ETYMOLOGY:
From Latin marmoreus (made of marble) from marmor (marble). Earliest documented use: 1798.

USAGE:
"Bernhard Schlink's intelligent book [The Reader] has been frozen in marmoreal stillness."
David Denby; Curious Cases; The New Yorker; Feb 9, 2009.

Explore "marmoreal" in the Visual Thesaurus.

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY:
To blame the poor for subsisting on welfare has no justice unless we are also willing to judge every rich member of society by how productive he or she is. Taken individual by individual, it is likely that there's more idleness and abuse of government favors among the economically privileged than among the ranks of the disadvantaged. -Norman Mailer, author (1923-2007)

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Bài gửiTiêu đề: Re: Words that you don't see everyday   Thu Sep 20, 2012 12:15 pm

tenuous

PRONUNCIATION:
(TEN-yoo-uhs)

MEANING:
adjective: Very weak; unsubstantiated; thin.

ETYMOLOGY:
From Latin tenuis (thin). Ultimately from the Indo-European root ten- (to stretch), which is also the source of tense, tenet, tendon, tent, tenor, tender, pretend, extend, tenure, tetanus, hypotenuse, tenable, extenuate, countenance, pertinacious, and detente. Earliest documented use: 1597.

USAGE:
"[Arizona governor Jan] Brewer's grasp of facts is tenuous: she told The Arizona Republic in 2010 that her father died fighting the Nazis in Germany, when he died a decade after the end of the war."
Maureen Dowd; Tension on the Tarmac; The New York Times; Jan 28, 2012.

Explore "tenuous" in the Visual Thesaurus.

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY:
Not that I want to be a god or a hero. Just to change into a tree, grow for ages, not hurt anyone. -Czeslaw Milosz, poet and novelist (1911-2004)

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Bài gửiTiêu đề: Re: Words that you don't see everyday   Mon Sep 24, 2012 12:14 pm

hiemal


PRONUNCIATION:
(HY-uh-muhl)

MEANING:
adjective: Of or relating to winter.

ETYMOLOGY:
From Latin hiems (winter). Ultimately from the Indo-European root ghei- (winter), which is the ancestor of words such as chimera, hibernate, and the Himalayas (from Sanskrit him (snow) + alaya (abode)). Earliest documented use: 1560.

USAGE:
"Painted turtles tend to move into deeper water during the autumnal season, and dormancy occurs during the hiemal period."
Carl Ernst and Jeffrey Lovich; Turtles of the United States and Canada; The Johns Hopkins University Press; 2009.

Explore "hiemal" in the Visual Thesaurus.

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY:
Of all the preposterous assumptions of humanity over humanity, nothing exceeds most of the criticisms made on the habits of the poor by the well-housed, well-warmed, and well-fed. -Herman Melville, novelist and poet (1819-1891)


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Bài gửiTiêu đề: Re: Words that you don't see everyday   Mon Sep 24, 2012 12:16 pm

Yoda of the Star Wars universe once advised, "Do. Or do not. There is no try." Clearly, by saying "Do", he was exhorting one to take action. But in English the word "try" is also a verb, an action word. And not to quarrel with the wise Yoda, but sometimes to choose not to do is also a form of action.
This week we'll arm you with five verbs and send you on your way to do, to do not, or to try. Go explore faraway galaxies or your corner of the world.


crepitate


PRONUNCIATION:
(KREP-i-tayt)

MEANING:
verb intr.: To make a crackling or popping sound.

ETYMOLOGY:
From Latin crepitare (to crackle), frequentative of crepare (to rattle, crack). Earliest documented use: 1623.

USAGE:
"John Grisham's sentences thud and crepitate all over the page, and he has become a literary tycoon."
Gene Weingarten; The Fiddler in the Subway; Simon & Schuster; 2010.

Explore "crepitate" in the Visual Thesaurus.

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY:
My feeling is that there is nothing in life but refraining from hurting others, and comforting those who are sad. -Olive Schreiner, author (1855-1920)

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Bài gửiTiêu đề: Re: Words that you don't see everyday   Tue Sep 25, 2012 12:09 pm

ramify

PRONUNCIATION:
(RAM-i-fy)

MEANING:
verb tr., intr.: To divide into branches.

ETYMOLOGY:
From Latin ramus (branch). Ultimately from the Indo-European root wrad- (root) which also sprouted words such as root, wort, licorice, radical, radish, rutabaga, eradicate, and deracinate. Earliest documented use: 1425.

USAGE:
"Andrew offered to read me a handful of passages from the manuscript ... which had ramified so uncontrollably that it was turning into several distinct projects."
Nicolas Rothwell; The Red Highway; Black Inc.; 2009.

Explore "ramify" in the Visual Thesaurus.

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY:
Children have never been very good at listening to their elders, but they have never failed to imitate them. -James Baldwin, writer (1924-1987)


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Bài gửiTiêu đề: Re: Words that you don't see everyday   Wed Oct 03, 2012 6:06 pm

ameliorate

PRONUNCIATION:
(a-MEL-yuh-rayt, uh-MEE-lee-)

MEANING:
verb tr., intr.: To make or grow better; to improve.

ETYMOLOGY:
From Latin melior (better). Earliest documented use: 1767.

USAGE:
"An offhand allusion to luggage problems and the presentation of his 'platinum preferred' credit card had seemed to ameliorate most of the doubts about his desirability as a guest."
Carole Buck; A Bride for Saint Nick; Silhouette Books; 1996.

Explore "ameliorate" in the Visual Thesaurus.

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY:
As to conforming outwardly and living your own life inwardly, I do not think much of that. -Henry David Thoreau, naturalist and author (1817-1862)

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Bài gửiTiêu đề: Re: Words that you don't see everyday   Wed Oct 03, 2012 6:07 pm

adhibit


PRONUNCIATION:

(ad-HIB-it)

MEANING:
verb tr.:
1. To let in; admit.
2. To administer.
3. To affix or attach.

ETYMOLOGY:
From Latin adhibere (to bring to), from ad- (to) + habere (to have, hold). Ultimately from the Indo-European root ghabh- (to give or to receive), which is also the source of give, gift, able, habit, prohibit, due, duty, and habile. Earliest documented use: 1528.

USAGE:
"Morgiana asked the druggist for more medicine and essences such as are adhibited to the sick when at death's door."
Translator: Richard Burton; Ali Baba and The Forty Thieves.

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY:
Millions long for immortality who do not know what to do with themselves on a rainy Sunday afternoon. -Susan Ertz, author (1894-1985)

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Bài gửiTiêu đề: Re: Words that you don't see everyday   Wed Oct 03, 2012 6:07 pm

At one time the Roman and Greek gods were as real to people then as our gods are to us now. They bowed before them, they built temples, they made offerings.
Yet no one today in his sane mind thinks praying to Aesculapius is going to heal anyone. Perhaps a time will come when future generations will look at our gods just as we look at gods from Greek and Roman mythologies.

At any rate, this week we are celebrating gods whose stock has fallen. If nothing else, let's thank them for enriching us with entertaining stories and descriptive words that are now part of our language.


Aesculapian or Esculapian

PRONUNCIATION:
(es-kyuh-LAY-pee-ehn)

MEANING:
adjective: Relating to medicine.
noun: A doctor.

ETYMOLOGY:
After Aesculapius, the god of medicine and healing in Greco-Roman mythology. One of his daughters was named Hygieia. Earliest documented use: 1604.

NOTES:
The Rod of Aesculapius (⚕), a single snake around a staff is used as a symbol related to medicinal arts, though sometimes it is confused with caduceus (☤), the staff of Hermes, with wings and two snakes around it.

USAGE:
"Dr. Rollins, the eminent Aesculapian, is having a secret affair with A.J. Morgan."
Francine Pascal; Sweet Valley Confidential; St. Martin's Press; 2011.

Explore "aesculapian" in the Visual Thesaurus.

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY:
Whenever books are burned men also in the end are burned. -Heinrich Heine, poet, journalist, and essayist (1797-1856)


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Bài gửiTiêu đề: Re: Words that you don't see everyday   Wed Oct 03, 2012 6:08 pm

protean


PRONUNCIATION:
(pro-TEE-uhn)

MEANING:
adjective:
1. Assuming many forms: variable.
2. Able to handle many different things, as roles in a play. Versatile.

ETYMOLOGY:
After Proteus, a sea god in Greek mythology, who could assume different forms. He got his name from Greek protos (first) as he was one of the earliest sea gods. Earliest documented use: 1594.

USAGE:
"Bruce Chatwin: Such a protean character, a man of many parts. A man who loved the austere but was also flamboyant in manner."
Thor Kah Hoong; Protean Character; The Star (Petaling Jaya, Malaysia); Feb 27, 2007.

Explore "protean" in the Visual Thesaurus.

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY:
The law, in its majestic equality, forbids the rich as well as the poor to sleep under bridges, to beg in the streets, and to steal bread. -Anatole France, novelist, essayist, Nobel laureate (1844-1924)

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Bài gửiTiêu đề: Re: Words that you don't see everyday   Wed Oct 03, 2012 6:10 pm

terpsichorean


PRONUNCIATION:
(turp-si-kuh-REE-uhn, turp-si-KOR-ee-uhn, -KORE-)

MEANING:
adjective: Of or relating to dancing.
noun: A dancer.

ETYMOLOGY:
From Terpsichore, the Muse of dancing and choral song in Greek mythology. The word Terpsichore is the feminine form of terpsichoros (delighting in the dance), a combination of Greek terpein (to delight) and khoros (dance), which is ultimately from the Indo-European root gher- (to grasp or to enclose), also the source of chorus, carol, choir, garth, court, and garden. Earliest documented use: 1825.

USAGE:
"Each week, performers on the Fox terpsichorean competition So You Think You Can Dance have to learn new dance routines."
Rick Bentley; Choreographers Put Hearts Into Dance Too; The Columbus Dispatch (Ohio); Sep 3, 2012.

Explore "terpsichorean" in the Visual Thesaurus.

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY:
I wish I could have known earlier that you have all the time you'll need right up to the day you die. -William Wiley, artist (b. 1937)

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Bài gửiTiêu đề: Re: Words that you don't see everyday   Fri Oct 05, 2012 2:39 pm

bacchanal


PRONUNCIATION:
(BAK-uh-nal, -nahl)

MEANING:
noun:
1. A wild and drunken celebration.
2. A drunken reveler.

ETYMOLOGY:
After Bacchus, the god of wine in Roman mythology. His Greek equivalent is Dionysus. Earliest documented use: 1536.

USAGE:
"The move backfired, encouraging instead a bacchanal of booze, followed by a parade of puking."
Ben Butler; Corporate Delinquents Drink to Better Times; The Age (Melbourne, Australia); Sep 3, 2012.

Explore "bacchanal" in the Visual Thesaurus.

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY:
In a world of fugitives, the person taking the opposite direction will appear to run away. -T.S. Eliot, poet (1888-1965)


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Bài gửiTiêu đề: Re: Words that you don't see everyday   Fri Oct 05, 2012 2:40 pm

morphean


PRONUNCIATION:
(mor-FEE-uhn)

MEANING:
adjective:
1. Sleep-inducing.
2. Of or related to sleep or drowsiness.

ETYMOLOGY:
After Morpheus, the god of dreams in Greek mythology. He was the son of Hypnos, the god of sleep. The name of the drug morph ine is also derived after Morpheus. Earliest documented use: 1641.

USAGE:
"The audience at the Institute of Directors convention began to drift off under the Morphean influence of such tired words as 'stakeholder' and 'strategic'."
Khalid Aziz; Speaking Out; Management Today (Teddington, UK); Sep 2003.

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY:
A teacher affects eternity; he can never tell where his influence stops. -Henry Adams, historian and teacher (1838-1918)

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Bài gửiTiêu đề: Re: Words that you don't see everyday   Mon Oct 08, 2012 1:26 pm

A.Word.A.Day
with Anu Garg

What makes a good usage example for a word? It's not one single attribute. We try to find examples that, besides illustrating a word clearly, are topical, short, funny, and informative, though it's not always feasible to have it all. When it's an unusual word, we're lucky to find more than a couple of recent examples of its use.
Readers sometimes ask if they can read the whole story mentioned in the usage example. It's not always possible as the quoted article may not be freely available on the web.

This week's five words have interesting usage examples and include links to their complete texts. These examples are from several fields -- technology, religion, politics, literature, zoology, and more -- but they are all worth reading and provide food for thought.


inveigh

PRONUNCIATION:
(in-VAY)

MEANING:
verb intr.: To complain or protest with great hostility.

ETYMOLOGY:
From Latin invehi (to attack with words), from invehere (to carry in). Ultimately from the Indo-European root wegh- (to go or to transport in a vehicle) that also gave us deviate, way, weight, wagon, vogue, vehicle, vector, envoy, and trivial. Earliest documented use: 1486.

USAGE:
"The rabbi inveighed against anyone possessing the popular smartphone. 'A religious person who owns this impure device is an abomination and a disgusting, vile villain,' he said."
Jeremy Sharon; Rabbi Strikes Against iPhone; The Jerusalem Post (Israel); Sep 14, 2012.

Explore "inveigh" in the Visual Thesaurus.

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY:
Who knows what Columbus would have discovered if America hadn't got in the way. -Stanislaw J. Lec, poet and aphorist (1909-1966)


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Bài gửiTiêu đề: Re: Words that you don't see everyday   Tue Oct 09, 2012 2:16 pm

apostle


PRONUNCIATION:
(uh-POS-uhl)

MEANING:
noun: A strong supporter or pioneer of a policy, cause, or belief.

ETYMOLOGY:
From Greek apostolos (messenger). Earliest documented use: 950.

USAGE:
"Romney is the frontman and apostle of an economic revolution, in which transactions are manufactured instead of products, wealth is generated without accompanying prosperity, and Cayman Islands partnerships are lovingly erected and nurtured while American communities fall apart."
Matt Taibbi; Greed and Debt: The True Story of Mitt Romney and Bain Capital; Rolling Stone (New York); Aug 29, 2012.

Explore "apostle" in the Visual Thesaurus.

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY:
Between truth and the search for truth, I opt for the second. -Bernard Berenson, art historian (1865-1959)


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Bài gửiTiêu đề: Re: Words that you don't see everyday   Tue Oct 16, 2012 5:48 pm

mense

PRONUNCIATION:
(mens)

MEANING:
noun: Propriety, decorum.
verb tr.: To adorn, grace.

ETYMOLOGY:
From Middle English menske (honor), from Old Norse mennska (humanity). Earliest documented use: before 1525.

USAGE:
"Auld Vandal! ye but show your little mense,
Just much about it wi' your scanty sense:
Will your poor, narrow foot-path of a street,
Where twa wheel-barrows tremble when they meet."
Robert Burns; The Brigs Of Ayr; 1787.

NOTES:
These lines are from a poem Burns wrote about a dialog between two bridges when the construction of a new bridge began over the Ayr in Scotland in 1786. The Auld Brig retorts to the above mocking by New Brig that one shouldn't get carried away in vanity and pride:
"I'll be a brig when ye're a shapeless cairn!"
The poet's words proved prophetic when in the 1877 flood the New Brig collapsed into a heap of stones while the Auld Brig still stands.

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY:
We sometimes congratulate ourselves at the moment of waking from a troubled dream; it may be so the moment after death. -Nathaniel Hawthorne, writer (1804-1864)

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Bài gửiTiêu đề: Re: Words that you don't see everyday   Tue Oct 16, 2012 5:49 pm

bunbury

PRONUNCIATION:
(BUN-buh-ree)

MEANING:
noun: An imaginary person whose name is used as an excuse to some purpose, especially to visit a place.
verb intr.: To use the name of a fictitious person as an excuse.

ETYMOLOGY:
From Oscar Wilde's play The Importance of Being Earnest where the character Algernon invents an imaginary person named Bunbury as an alibi to escape from relatives. He explains to his friend, "I have invented an invaluable permanent invalid called Bunbury, in order that I may be able to go down into the country whenever I choose. Bunbury is perfectly invaluable. If it wasn't for Bunbury's extraordinary bad health, for instance, I wouldn't be able to dine with you at Willis's to-night." Earliest documented use: 1899.

USAGE:
There are birds who bunbury. One of them is the blackbird."
Jesko Partecke; The Birds Who Bunbury; Deutsche Welle (Germany); May 22, 2007.

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY:
Few are the giants of the soul who actually feel that the human race is their family circle. -Freya Stark, explorer and writer (1893-1993)

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Bài gửiTiêu đề: Re: Words that you don't see everyday   Tue Oct 16, 2012 5:50 pm

feint

PRONUNCIATION:
(faynt)

MEANING:
noun: A deceptive move, especially in fencing or boxing.
verb: To make a deceptive movement.

ETYMOLOGY:
From Old French feinte, past participle of feindre (to feign), from Latin fingere (to shape). Ultimately from the Indo-European root dheigh- (to build or form), which also gave us fiction, effigy, paradise, dough, dairy, and lady (literally, a loaf kneader). Earliest documented use: around 1330.

USAGE:
"Journalists could argue they use appellations as sign of respect, but I think it's a feint -- a touch of obsequiousness before sticking in the shiv."
Emily Yoffe; You Are Not the Speaker; Slate (New York); Mar 20, 2012.

Explore "feint" in the Visual Thesaurus.

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY:
What is the use of a fine house if you haven't got a tolerable planet to put it on. -Henry David Thoreau, naturalist and author (1817-1862)

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Bài gửiTiêu đề: Re: Words that you don't see everyday   Tue Oct 16, 2012 5:51 pm

Pollyanna

PRONUNCIATION:
(pol-ee-AN-uh)

MEANING:
noun: A naively cheerful and optimistic person.

ETYMOLOGY:
After Pollyanna Whittier, heroine of novels by Eleanor Porter (1868-1920). Pollyanna is an indefatigable optimist and teaches everyone to play the "glad game": find something to be glad about, no matter what tragedy befalls. Earliest documented use: 1917.

USAGE:
"So the doctrine of positive thinking does not require you to close your eyes and ears to the world. It does not require you to become a Pollyanna, calling everything wonderful, no matter how horrid it is."
A Thought About Negative Thinking; Deccan Chronicle (India); Sep 16, 2012.

Explore "pollyanna" in the Visual Thesaurus.

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY:
A clay pot sitting in the sun will always be a clay pot. It has to go through the white heat of the furnace to become porcelain. -Mildred Witte Stouven

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Bài gửiTiêu đề: Re: Words that you don't see everyday   Tue Oct 16, 2012 5:52 pm

Jeremiah

PRONUNCIATION:
(jer-uh-MY-uh)

MEANING:
noun: A person who complains continually, has a gloomy attitude, or one who warns about a disastrous future.

ETYMOLOGY:
After Jeremiah, a Hebrew prophet during the seventh and sixth centuries BCE who prophesied the fall of the kingdom of Judah and whose writings (see jeremiad) are collected in the Book of Jeremiah and the Book of Lamentations. Earliest documented use: 1781.

USAGE:
"Economists are pretty reluctant to forecast a recession ... perhaps because no one loves a Jeremiah.
Shorter Cycles?; The Economist (London, UK); Sep 12, 2011.

Explore "jeremiah" in the Visual Thesaurus.

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY:
The skylines lit up at dead of night, the air-conditioning systems cooling empty hotels in the desert and artificial light in the middle of the day all have something both demented and admirable about them. The mindless luxury of a rich civilization, and yet of a civilization perhaps as scared to see the lights go out as was the hunter in his primitive night. -Jean Baudrillard, sociologist and philosopher (1929-2007)

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Bài gửiTiêu đề: Re: Words that you don't see everyday   Wed Oct 17, 2012 2:29 pm

Micawber

PRONUNCIATION:
(mih-KAW-buhr)

MEANING:
noun: An eternal optimist.

ETYMOLOGY:
After Wilkins Micawber, an incurable optimist in the novel David Copperfield (1850) by Charles Dickens. His schemes for making money never materialize, but he's always hopeful that "something will turn up". Earliest documented example of the word used allusively: 1852.

USAGE:
"As the shadow work-and-pensions secretary, David Willetts, said yesterday, he takes the Mr Micawber approach to economics: something will turn up."
Larry Elliott; Mr Micawber May Find Result Misery; The Guardian (London, UK); Nov 4, 2004.

Explore "Micawber" in the Visual Thesaurus.

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY:
Nature never said to me: Do not be poor. Still less did she say: Be rich. Her cry to me was always: Be independent. -Nicolas de Chamfort, writer (1741-1794)

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