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 Words that you don't see everyday

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Bài gửiTiêu đề: Re: Words that you don't see everyday   Thu Oct 18, 2012 11:40 am

cassandra

PRONUNCIATION:
(kuh-SAND-ruh)

MEANING:
noun: One who prophesies disaster and whose warnings are unheeded.

ETYMOLOGY:
After Cassandra in Greek mythology who received the gift of prophecy but was later cursed never to be believed. Earliest documented use: 1670.

NOTES:
Cassandra was the daughter of the Trojan king Priam and Hecuba. Apollo, the god of light, who also controlled the fine arts, music, and eloquence, granted her the ability to see the future. But when she didn't return his love, he condemned her never to be believed. Among other things, Cassandra warned about the Trojan horse that the Greeks left but her warning was ignored.

USAGE:
"I had become a Cassandra -- I could see bad things on the road ahead but couldn't stop us from recklessly rolling over them."
Douglas Edwards; I'm Feeling Lucky: The Confessions of Google Employee Number 59; Houghton Mifflin Harcourt; 2011.

Explore "Cassandra" in the Visual Thesaurus.

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY:
The late F.W.H. Myers used to tell how he asked a man at a dinner table what he thought would happen to him when he died. The man tried to ignore the question, but on being pressed, replied: "Oh well, I suppose I shall inherit eternal bliss, but I wish you wouldn't talk about such unpleasant subjects." -Bertrand Russell, philosopher, mathematician, author, Nobel laureate (1872-1970)

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Bài gửiTiêu đề: Re: Words that you don't see everyday   Fri Oct 19, 2012 2:25 pm

Pangloss


PRONUNCIATION:
(PAN-glos)

MEANING:
noun: One who is optimistic regardless of the circumstances.
adjective: Blindly or unreasonably optimistic.

ETYMOLOGY:
After Dr. Pangloss, a philosopher and tutor in Voltaire's 1759 satire Candide. Pangloss believes that, in spite of what happens -- shipwreck, earthquake, hanging, flogging, and more -- "All is for the best in the best of all possible worlds." The name is coined from Greek panglossia (talkativeness). Earliest documented use: 1794.

USAGE:
"Steven Pinker is a Pangloss ... The world is a better place than it used to be."
Bill McSweeney; Why We Should Look on the Bright Side; The Irish Times (Dublin); Dec 3, 2011.

"Don Regan tried to pick up where Mike Deaver left off in the spin game of gilding foul-ups with a Pangloss sheen, but he was a bit too candid."
Jim Fain; Lights, Action, Camera Again; Observer-Reporter (Pennsylvania); Aug 14, 1987.

Explore "Pangloss" in the Visual Thesaurus.

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY:
I think that to get under the surface and really appreciate the beauty of a country, one has to go there poor. -Grace Moore, actress and singer (1898-1947)

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Bài gửiTiêu đề: Re: Words that you don't see everyday   Tue Oct 23, 2012 1:45 pm

A guinea pig is not a pig, nor is it from Guinea. It's a rodent from South America. Sweetbread is neither sweet nor bread. It's the pancreas or thymus of an animal used for food. The movie director Norman Jewison is neither a Norman nor a Jew. He's a Canadian Christian. Nobody said names for people or things have to make sense.
This week we'll feature five terms that do not mean what you might think they mean.


predial or praedial


PRONUNCIATION:
(PREE-dee-uhl)

MEANING:
adjective: Of or relating to land, farming, etc.

ETYMOLOGY:
From Latin praedium (estate), from praes (bondsman), from prae- (before) + vas (surety). Earliest documented use: 1461.

USAGE:
"Agrarian outbreaks, in many places, assumed the aspect of a predial war."
Johnson Rossiter; The Great Events by Famous Historians; 1905.

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY:
Where the light is brightest, the shadows are deepest. -Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, poet, dramatist, novelist, and philosopher (1749-1832)

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Bài gửiTiêu đề: Re: Words that you don't see everyday   Tue Oct 23, 2012 1:46 pm

Hibernian


PRONUNCIATION:
(hy-BUR-nee-uhn)

MEANING:
adjective: Of or relating to Ireland.
noun: A native or inhabitant of Ireland.

ETYMOLOGY:
From Hibernia, the Latin name for Ireland. The word hibernate is from Latin hibernare (to spend the winter). Earliest documented use: 1632.

USAGE:
"This lively bar is long on Hibernian charm, and patrons are smitten with the pub's thick Irish stew."
Indianapolis Monthly; Sep 2008.

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY:
The worst kind of people are those who confuse kindness for weakness. -Werner Makowski, banker (b. 1929)

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Bài gửiTiêu đề: Re: Words that you don't see everyday   Thu Oct 25, 2012 10:48 am

histrionics

PRONUNCIATION:
(his-tree-ON-iks)

MEANING:
noun:
1. Melodramatic or hysterical behavior calculated for effect.
2. Theatrical performances.

ETYMOLOGY:
From Latin histrio (actor). Earliest documented use: 1824.

USAGE:
"The notion that men can face adversity with stoicism while women are more likely to respond with histrionics is just one example of the gender stereotypes that permeate our culture."
Kayt Sukel; Pink Brains, Blue Brains, Purple People; New Scientist (London, UK); May 26, 2012.

Explore "histrionics" in the Visual Thesaurus.

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY:
Death destroys the body, as the scaffolding is destroyed after the building is up and finished. And he whose building is up rejoices at the destruction of the scaffolding and of the body. -Leo Tolstoy, novelist and philosopher (1828-1910)

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Bài gửiTiêu đề: Re: Words that you don't see everyday   Thu Oct 25, 2012 10:49 am

blousy or blowsy or blowzy

PRONUNCIATION:
(BLOU-zee)

MEANING:
adjective:
1. Having a coarsely ruddy complexion.
2. Disheveled.

ETYMOLOGY:
From English dialect blowze (wench). Earliest documented use: around 1770.

USAGE:
"She appears transformed from the dowdy, blousy woman with big hair."
Hillary in the Oval Office; Irish Independent (Dublin); Mar 25, 2006.

Explore "blousy" in the Visual Thesaurus.

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY:
You know what getting married is? It's agreeing to taking this person who right now is at the top of his form, full of hopes and ideas, feeling good, looking good, wildly interested in you because you're the same way, and sticking by him while he slowly disintegrates. And he does the same for you. You're his responsibility now and he's yours. If no one else will take care of him, you will. If everyone else rejects you, he won't. What do you think love is? Going to bed all the time? -Jane Smiley, novelist (b.1949)

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Bài gửiTiêu đề: Re: Words that you don't see everyday   Fri Oct 26, 2012 8:06 pm

redoubtable


PRONUNCIATION:
(ri-DOU-tuh-buhl)

MEANING:
adjective: Arousing fear or awe; evoking respect or honor.

ETYMOLOGY:
From Old French redoutable, from redouter (to dread), from re- (again) + douter (to doubt, fear). Ultimately from the Indo-European root dwo- (two) that also gave us dual, double, dubious, doubt, diploma, twin, between, and didymous. Earliest documented use: 1421.

USAGE:
"Even the redoubtable German economy now seems to be buckling."
Powering Down; The Economist (London, UK); Jul 7, 2012.

Explore "redoubtable" in the Visual Thesaurus.

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY:
The moral test of government is how that government treats those who are in the dawn of life, the children; those who are in the twilight of life, the elderly; and those who are in the shadows of life -- the sick, the needy and the handicapped. -Hubert Horatio Humphrey, US Vice President (1911-1978)

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Bài gửiTiêu đề: Re: Words that you don't see everyday   Fri Nov 02, 2012 4:18 pm

By the time campaigning ends next week, billions of dollars will have been spent to snag it: the job of US President. All those bucks for a position that lasts only four years with a salary of less than half a million dollars a year. But weighing the post by its salary is like saying that Olympic athletes sweat for years just to pocket a few hundred dollars' worth of gold.
The post of President of the United States carries immense power to make decisions that affect, for better or worse, people around the world. The effects of the actions of a president last for years. Even eponyms (words coined after someone's name) enter the language that reflect their legacy, such as Reaganomics, teddy bear (after Theodore Roosevelt), etc.

This week we feature words that may appear to have been coined after this year's candidates, but they have been in the language even before these candidates were born.

Enjoy these words, and don't forget to vote!


obambulate

PRONUNCIATION:
(o-BAM-byuh-layt)

MEANING:
verb intr.: To walk about.

ETYMOLOGY:
From Latin ob- (to) + ambulare (to walk). Earliest documented use: 1614.

USAGE:
"We have often seen noble statesmen obambulating (as Dr. Johnson would say) the silent engraving-room, obviously rehearsing their orations."
The Year's Art; J.S. Virtue & Co.; 1917.

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY:
I have nothing new to teach the world. Truth and non-violence are as old as the hills. All I have done is to try experiments in both on as vast a scale as I could. -Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi (1869-1948)

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Bài gửiTiêu đề: Re: Words that you don't see everyday   Fri Nov 02, 2012 4:19 pm

bidentate

PRONUNCIATION:
(by-DEN-tayt)

MEANING:
adjective: Having two teeth or toothlike parts.

ETYMOLOGY:
From Latin bi- (two) + dens (tooth). Earliest documented use: 1826.

USAGE:
"Noah and his wife humorously feed all the beasts; Noah pours a pail of milk into the hippo's gaping bidentate mouth."
Jon Solomon; The Ancient World in the Cinema; Yale University Press; 2001.

Explore "bidentate" in the Visual Thesaurus.

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY:
The sick do not ask if the hand that smooths their pillow is pure, nor the dying care if the lips that touch their brow have known the kiss of sin. -Oscar Wilde, writer (1854-1900)

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Bài gửiTiêu đề: Re: Words that you don't see everyday   Fri Nov 02, 2012 4:19 pm

Mitty

PRONUNCIATION:
(MIT-ee)

MEANING:
noun: An ordinary, timid person who indulges in daydreams involving great adventures and triumphs.

ETYMOLOGY:
After the title character in The Secret Life of Walter Mitty, a short story (1939) by James Thurber, later made into a movie (1947) of the same name.

NOTES:
James Thurber's story appeared in the March 18, 1939 issue of the New Yorker. In the story, Walter Mitty is a meek husband, rather uxorious, who fantasizes of great exploits to escape the humdrum of daily life. One minute he is dreaming of being a heroic pilot ("Throw on the power lights! Rev her up to 8500!"), next minute he becomes a daring naval commander. In his next thought he transforms into a master surgeon, and even a cool killer.

USAGE:
"It was not a Mitty dream. It was no fantasy at all."
Richard Bach; A Gift of Wings; Dell; 1974.

Explore "mitty" in the Visual Thesaurus.

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY:
You can't do anything with anybody's body to make it dirty to me. Six people, eight people, one person -- you can do only one thing to make it dirty: kill it. Hiroshima was dirty. -Lenny Bruce, comedian and social critic (1925-1966)


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Bài gửiTiêu đề: Re: Words that you don't see everyday   Fri Nov 02, 2012 4:20 pm

barrack

PRONUNCIATION:
(BAR-uhk, the first syllable is the same as in barrel)

MEANING:
verb tr., intr.: 1. To shout in support: to cheer.
verb tr., intr.: 2. To shout against: to jeer.
noun: 3. A building used to house soldiers.
verb tr., intr.: 4. To provide with accommodation.

ETYMOLOGY:
For 1 & 2: Perhaps from Northern Ireland dialectal barrack (to brag). Earliest documented use: 1885.
For 2 & 3: From French baraque, from Italian baracca or Spanish barraca (hut, tent). Earliest documented use: 1686.

USAGE:
"Raphael Clarke said: Every kid wants to play for the team they barrack for."
Lyall Johnson; Clarkes Praise the Saints; The Age (Melbourne, Australia); Nov 23, 2003.

"During the debate, then Socred leader Rita Johnston and NDP leader Mike Harcourt were barracking away at each other about corruption."
Ross Howard; TV Debate; The Globe and Mail (Toronto, Canada); May 16, 1996.

Explore "barrack" in the Visual Thesaurus.

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY:
Be humble for you are made of Earth. Be noble for you are made of stars. -Serbian proverb

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Bài gửiTiêu đề: Re: Words that you don't see everyday   Wed Nov 07, 2012 3:38 pm

In olden times, people were named according to what they did: Potter, Smith, Miller, and so on. Sometimes they were named for their qualities: Goodman, Wise, etc. Some of the well-known historical personalities have earned nicknames like that: Charles the Great, Eric the Red, Ivan the Terrible.
But why leave that to the past? You could name your friends, family, and co-workers in that manner even today. This week we'll look at five uncommon adjectives to describe people to help you get started.


emulous


PRONUNCIATION:
(EM-yuh-luhs)

MEANING:
adjective:
1. Eager to imitate, equal, or to surpass another.
2. Jealous or envious.


ETYMOLOGY:
From Latin aemulus. Ultimately from the Indo-European root aim- (copy), which also gave us emulate, imitate, image, and imagine. Earliest documented use: 1398.

USAGE:
"This show feels assembled by an emulous shopaholic who looked around at the tourist-drawing hits of the last decade and said: 'I want some of that. And that. Ooh, and can I have that, too?'"
Ben Brantley; Sisterhood vs. Boss; The New York Times; May 1, 2009.

Explore "emulous" in the Visual Thesaurus.

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY:
We all have to rise in the end, not just one or two who were smart enough, had will enough for their own salvation, but all the halt, the maimed and the blind of us which is most of us. -Maureen Duffy, poet, playwright, and novelist (b. 1933)

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Bài gửiTiêu đề: Re: Words that you don't see everyday   Wed Nov 07, 2012 3:38 pm

vegete


PRONUNCIATION:
(vuh-JEET)

MEANING:
adjective: Lively; active; vigorous.

ETYMOLOGY:
From Latin vegere (to enliven). Ultimately from the Indo-European root weg- (to be strong or lively), which also gave us vigor, velocity, and vegetable. Earliest documented use: 1639.

USAGE:
"I love to be my own master, when my spirits are prompt, when my brain is vegete and apt for thought."
Ralph Waldo Emerson's Journal; Jul 10, 1828.

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY:
A decent provision for the poor is the true test of civilisation. -Samuel Johnson, lexicographer (1709-1784)

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Bài gửiTiêu đề: Re: Words that you don't see everyday   Wed Nov 07, 2012 3:39 pm

nonesuch or nonsuch


PRONUNCIATION:
(NUN-such)

MEANING:
noun: A person or thing without an equal.

ETYMOLOGY:
From Old English nan, from ne (not) + Old English swelce/swylc. Earliest documented use: 290.

USAGE:
"Tell me, Margaret, who is this paragon, this nonesuch, this nonpareil."
Jane Odiwe; Willoughby's Return; Sourcebooks; 2009.

Explore "nonesuch" in the Visual Thesaurus.

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY:
Truth never damages a cause that is just. -Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi (1869-1948)

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Bài gửiTiêu đề: Re: Words that you don't see everyday   Thu Nov 08, 2012 12:58 pm

pervicacious


PRONUNCIATION:
(puhr-vi-KAY-shuhs)

MEANING:
adjective: Very stubborn.

ETYMOLOGY:
From Latin pervicax (stubborn). Earliest documented use: 1633.

USAGE:
"Your grandmother had spunk, bless her pervicacious soul. ... She had a stubborn streak, you see, very stubborn."
David Curry Kahn; Her Mother's Diary; Wheatmark; 2010.

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY:
When two opposite points of view are expressed with equal intensity, the truth does not necessarily lie exactly halfway between them. It is possible for one side to be simply wrong. -Richard Dawkins, biologist and author (b. 1941)

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Bài gửiTiêu đề: Re: Words that you don't see everyday   Tue Nov 13, 2012 11:10 am

cautelous

PRONUNCIATION:
(KOT-uh-luhs)

MEANING:
adjective:
1. Cautious.
2. Crafty.

ETYMOLOGY:
From French cauteleux (cunning). Earliest documented use: 1384.

USAGE:
"Boeotian and cautelous people should not read this ad! You're reading on? Great! You're obviously bright, adventurous, and game enough for Belvoir St Theatre."
The Sydney Morning Herald (Australia); Feb 25, 1987.

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY:
If you do not tell the truth about yourself you cannot tell it about other people. -Virginia Woolf, writer (1882-1941)

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Bài gửiTiêu đề: Re: Words that you don't see everyday   Tue Nov 13, 2012 11:11 am

Mark Twain once said, "My philological studies have satisfied me that a gifted person ought to learn English (barring spelling and pronouncing) in thirty hours, French in thirty days, and German in thirty years."
Well, how hard it is to learn a language depends on what language you speak to begin with. If you speak English you have a head start as it's a Germanic language. English father and German vater are not that different. But there's a nugget of truth in Twain's claim. German doesn't try to make it any easier. It has three genders, four cases, six ways of writing the definite article, 12 ways of forming plurals ... and we have only scratched the surface.

Well, we can't help you with everything if you're learning the language, but we can help you with the vocabulary. This week we'll see five German words English has borrowed.


wunderkind

PRONUNCIATION:
(VOON-duhr-kind, wun-)


MEANING:
noun:
1. A child prodigy.
2. A person who achieves great success early in the career.

ETYMOLOGY:
From German Wunderkind, from Wunder (wonder) + Kind (child). Earliest documented use: 1891.

USAGE:
"Miguel Angel Sano is the wunderkind, one of the best young players the Dominican Republic has ever produced."
David Malitz; The Big Leagues' Hits and Errors; The Washington Post; Jul 13, 2012.

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY:
The trees that are slow to grow bear the best fruit. -Moliere, actor and playwright (1622-1673)

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Bài gửiTiêu đề: Re: Words that you don't see everyday   Tue Nov 13, 2012 11:12 am

gemutlichkeit

PRONUNCIATION:
(guh-myoot-lish-KYT, -likh-, -MOOT-)

MEANING:
noun: Warm friendliness; comfortableness; coziness.

ETYMOLOGY:
From German Gemütlichkeit, from gemütlich (comfortable, cozy). Earliest documented use: 1892.

USAGE:
"The establishment's gemutlichkeit is fueled by a low-key, funky decor and the friendliness of the staff."
Christopher Brooks; Cozy With Comfort Food; The New York Times; Jan 4, 2009.

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY:
The sense of wishing to be known only for what one really is is like putting on an old, easy, comfortable garment. You are no longer afraid of anybody or anything. You say to yourself, 'Here I am --- just so ugly, dull, poor, beautiful, rich, interesting, amusing, ridiculous -- take me or leave me.' And how absolutely beautiful it is to be doing only what lies within your own capabilities and is part of your own nature. It is like a great burden rolled off a man's back when he comes to want to appear nothing that he is not, to take out of life only what is truly his own. -David Grayson, journalist and author (1870-1946)


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Bài gửiTiêu đề: Re: Words that you don't see everyday   Wed Nov 14, 2012 3:42 pm

blitzkrieg

PRONUNCIATION:
(BLITS-kreeg)

MEANING:
noun: 1. An intense campaign, for example, an ad blitz. 2. A swift, sudden military attack, especially aerial bombardment.
verb tr.: To attack or destroy in a sudden campaign.

ETYMOLOGY:
From German Blitzkrieg, from Blitz (lightning) + Krieg (war). Earliest documented use: 1939.

USAGE:
"It was a blitzkrieg of love, an admiration avalanche."
Lenore Taylor; Hold on to Your Bonnets; The Sydney Morning Herald (Australia); Oct 6, 2012.

"It's an engineering blitzkrieg meant to awe the Chinese people and show off the nation's new industrial might."
Ian Johnson; China Advances High-Speed Rail Amid Safety, Corruption Concerns; National Geographic (Washington, DC); Oct 5, 2012.

Explore "blitzkrieg" in the Visual Thesaurus.

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY:
It is impossible to enjoy idling thoroughly unless one has plenty of work to do. There is no fun in doing nothing when you have nothing to do. Wasting time is merely an occupation then, and a most exhausting one. Idleness, like kisses, to be sweet must be stolen. -Jerome K. Jerome, humorist and playwright (1859-1927)


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Bài gửiTiêu đề: Re: Words that you don't see everyday   Fri Nov 16, 2012 11:25 am

kulturkampf


PRONUNCIATION:
(kool-TOOR-kahmpf)

MEANING:
noun: A cultural conflict, especially one religious in nature.

ETYMOLOGY:
From German Kulturkampf, from Kultur (culture) + Kampf (conflict). Earliest documented use: 1879.

NOTES:
The original Kulturkampf took place in the 1880s between the German government and the Roman Catholic Church over control of education, laws related to marriage, etc.

USAGE:
"Rabbi Michael Melchior: 'The settlers have succeeded in making [the withdrawal] a story of Judaism versus emptiness. They have turned it into a Kulturkampf.'"
Waiting for a Miracle; The Economist (London, UK); Aug 15, 2005.

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY:
To learn who rules over you, simply find out who you are not allowed to criticize. -Voltaire, philosopher (1694-1778)

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Bài gửiTiêu đề: Re: Words that you don't see everyday   Fri Nov 16, 2012 11:27 am

kaffeeklatsch


PRONUNCIATION:
(KAH-fee-klach)

MEANING:
noun: An informal social gathering for coffee and conversation.

ETYMOLOGY:
From German Kaffeeklatsch, from Kaffee (coffee) + Klatsch (gossip). Earliest documented use: 1888.

NOTES:
The word has many spelling variants: kaffeeklatch, kaffee klatch, kaffee klatsch, coffeeklatsch, coffeeklatch, coffee klatsch, coffee klatch.

USAGE:
"I can always count on my monthly kaffeeklatsches with my fellow scribes to surface the news items that really matter."
Ruth Walker; The Real Regular and the New Normal; The Christian Science Monitor (Boston, Massachusetts); Jun 8, 2010.

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY:
In our world of big names, curiously, our true heroes tend to be anonymous. In this life of illusion and quasi-illusion, the person of solid virtues who can be admired for something more substantial than his well-knownness often proves to be the unsung hero: the teacher, the nurse, the mother, the honest cop, the hard worker at lonely, underpaid, unglamorous, unpublicized jobs. -Daniel J Boorstin, historian, professor, attorney, and writer (1914-2004)

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Bài gửiTiêu đề: Re: Words that you don't see everyday   Tue Nov 20, 2012 1:12 am

here are thousands and thousands of them. In medicine, botany, chemistry, athletics, and other walks (and runs) of life. We use them all the time without even realizing it. They come with a whole story about themselves.
They are words derived from places or people, real and fictional, from history and mythology. They are known as toponyms and eponyms, from Greek topo- (place) + -onym (name), and epi- (upon) + -onym (name). This week we'll see five words coined after the names of people and places.


serendipity

PRONUNCIATION:
(ser-uhn-DIP-i-tee)

MEANING:
noun: The faculty of making fortunate discoveries by chance. Also, an instance of such a discovery.

ETYMOLOGY:
Coined by novelist Horace Walpole based on the fairy tale The Three Princes of Serendip. The Princes were supposedly making these happy discoveries they were not looking for. From Persian Sarandip (Sri Lanka), from Arabic sarandib. Earliest documented use: 1754.

USAGE:
"To maximise serendipity, Yossi Vardi cleverly mixes specialised conferences with the more eclectic kind."
In Search of Serendipity; The Economist (London, UK); Jul 22, 2010.

Explore "serendipity" in the Visual Thesaurus.

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY:
Men are often capable of greater things than they perform. They are sent into the world with bills of credit, and seldom draw to their full extent. -Horace Walpole, novelist and essayist (1717-1797)

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Bài gửiTiêu đề: Re: Words that you don't see everyday   Mon Nov 26, 2012 3:48 pm

mithridatism


PRONUNCIATION:
(MITH-ri-day-tiz-uhm)

MEANING:
noun: The developing of immunity to a poison by taking gradually increasing doses of it.

ETYMOLOGY:
After Mithridates VI, king of Pontus (now in Turkey) 120-63 BCE, who is said to have acquired immunity to poison by ingesting gradually larger doses of it. Earliest documented use: 1851.

NOTES:
Mithridates VI's father was poisoned. No wonder VI wanted to develop tolerance to poison. The story goes that after VI's defeat by Pompey, he didn't want to be captured alive. So he tried to end his life by taking poison. That didn't work, so he had a servant stab him with a sword.

USAGE:
"Some monks resorted to the direct ingestion of mercury and cinnabar, small quantities at first, but gradually building up the dosage as the body's tolerance increased -- an alchemical mithridatism."
Alexander Goldstein; The Foundling; Trafford Publishing; 2009.

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY:
Mere parsimony is not economy. Expense, and great expense, may be an essential part in true economy. -Edmund Burke, statesman and writer (1729-1797)


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Bài gửiTiêu đề: Re: Words that you don't see everyday   Mon Nov 26, 2012 3:49 pm

rhadamanthine


PRONUNCIATION:
(rad-a-MAN-thin, -thyn)

MEANING:
adjective: Inflexibly just or severe.

ETYMOLOGY:
In Greek mythology, Rhadamanthus was the son of Zeus and Europa. He was a judge of the underworld and known for his strict justice. Earliest documented use: 1778.

USAGE:
"Antoine Christophe Saliceti returned to his home island in the role of inflexible ideologue ... dispensing rhadamanthine justice."
Steven Englund; Napoleon: A Political Life; Scribner; 2003.

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY:
No man, for any considerable period, can wear one face to himself and another to the multitude, without finally getting bewildered as to which may be true. -Nathaniel Hawthorne, writer (1804-1864)

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Bài gửiTiêu đề: Re: Words that you don't see everyday   Mon Nov 26, 2012 3:49 pm

elysian


PRONUNCIATION:
(i-LIZH-uhn)

MEANING:
adjective: Blissful; delightful.

ETYMOLOGY:
From Latin Elysium, from Greek elysion pedyon (Elysian plain/fields). In Greek mythology, Elysium (or the Elysian Fields) was the final resting place for the souls of heroes and the virtuous after their death. Earliest documented use: 1579.

USAGE:
"Our neighbour stuck his head over the fence one arvo* and regaled me with Elysian illusions involving the company he worked for."
Doug Anderson; Summer Job: Toilet Assembler; The Sydney Morning Herald (Australia); Jan 10, 2012
* Australian slang for 'afternoon'

Explore "elysian" in the Visual Thesaurus.

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY:
I would rather be able to appreciate things I can not have than to have things I am not able to appreciate. -Elbert Hubbard, author, editor, printer (1856-1915)

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